Curriculum

At Corinthian Primary School we want every child to have high aspirations and to reach their full potential to become life-long learners. Every child has access to a broad and balanced curriculum which aims to meet the needs of all learners in a safe and stimulating environment. Our curriculum aims to challenge our children and to allow them to excel. We strongly promote self-respect for all in our school irrespective of race, creed or gender and we aim to embed tolerance of different cultures and religions.

All National Curriculum subjects are carefully planned and sequenced so that they progressively build on children’s prior learning by linking knowledge across different subjects. We are committed to providing a curriculum that not only empowers children by building knowledge and developing skills, but also develops children physically, socially, spiritually, morally, culturally, and artistically. We plan to develop children’s understanding of key vocabulary throughout the curriculum so that children become confident and articulate, with a deep understanding of key concepts. At Corinthian Primary School we have high expectations in standards of literacy and numeracy across all subjects.

Learning is engaging through ensuring that children have first-hand experiences through educational visits, through the varied sports that children can choose to do, through the clubs that we run during and after school and through visitors that share their expertise and knowledge. We aim to enrich the learning and promote responsibility, through planned outdoor learning, through gardening, eco-awareness, understanding sustainability and through collaboration in forest school. We also provide opportunities for learning by using the rich heritage of Liverpool and beyond, to ensure that children receive a cultural inheritance. Our intention is to grow and develop children with strong values who can contribute positively to the well-being of their community and to wider society and who can fulfil their potential.

Our curriculum is based upon principles founded within educational research. We teach new concepts in small steps so that children can learn new things without experiencing cognition overload. We ensure that we give children the knowledge that they need in order to become skilful in different areas of the curriculum. We give children lots of practice so that children’s learning can become fluent, efficient and flexible.

English

The overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written language, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. The national curriculum for English aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate
Maths

The National Curriculum for mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately
  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language
  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into a series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions

 

Liverpool Counts Quality Mark

 

  • The Liverpool Counts Quality Mark is part of a varied programme of strategies targeted at improving maths results for the city’s children
  • The specific aim of the Quality Mark is to tackle the negative attitudes which are prevalent in many areas of our society towards numeracy and mathematics
  • We aim to challenge these widely held views and promote a culture where people readily understand the impact of good numeracy skills and mathematics qualifications can have on the social, financial, health and employment aspects of their lives
  • We also aim to support teachers and other adults in our schools to encourage pupils to make connections in their numeracy and mathematics lessons to real life contexts and with other areas of their school experiences
Science

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future
Geography

The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
    • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
    • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
    • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length
History

The national curriculum for history aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts: understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales
Religious Education

The UK has a rich heritage of culture and diversity. This is continuing today in an era of globalisation and an increasingly interdependent world. Religion and belief for many people forms a crucial part of their culture and identity. Religion and beliefs have become more visible in public life locally, nationally and internationally. The impact of religion on society and public life is constantly brought to public attention through extensive media coverage. The rapid pace of development in scientific and medical technologies and the environmental debate continue to present new issues which raise religious, moral and social questions. The internet enables learning and encourages participation in public discussion of issues in a new and revolutionary way.

Computing

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology
Physical Education

The national curriculum for physical education aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • are physically active for sustained periods of time
  • engage in competitive sports and activities
  • lead healthy, active lives
Design Technology

The national curriculum for design and technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

 

  • develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook
PSHE

PSHE OverviewCorinthian Community Primary School are dedicated to making every opportunity for our children to think about others and their community through this very important part of our curriculum.  We will give the children opportunities to take part in class discussions and work as a whole school to create a postive and healthy learning environment.

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